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Can the subaltern speak? reflections on the history of an idea ed. by Rosalind C. Morris

Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: New York [u.a.] Columbia Univ. Press 2010Description: X, 318 S. 23 cmContent type:
  • Text
Media type:
  • ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen
Carrier type:
  • Band
ISBN:
  • 0231143850
  • 0231143842
  • 9780231143851
  • 9780231143844
Subject(s): Genre/Form: Additional physical formats: No title; No title; Online-Ausg.: Can the subaltern speak?; Erscheint auch als: Can the subaltern speak?DDC classification:
  • 325/.3 22
LOC classification:
  • JV51
Other classification:
  • LB 45000
  • EC 1878
  • 15.07
  • 89.91
Online resources: Summary: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak`s original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism`s "worlding" of the world. Spivak`s essay hones in on the historical and ideological factors that obstruct the possibility of being heard for those who inhabit the periphery. It is a probing interrogation of what it means to have political subjectivity, to be able to access the state, and to suffer the burden of difference in a capitalist system that promises equality yet withholds it at every turn. Since its publication, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" has been cited, invoked, imitated, and critiqued. In these phenomenal essays, eight scholars take stock of the effects and response to Spivak`s work. They begin by contextualizing the piece within the development of subaltern and postcolonial studies and the quest for human rights. Then, through the lens of Spivak`s essay, they rethink historical problems of subalternity, voicing, and death. A final section situates "Can the Subaltern Speak?" within contemporary issues, particularly new international divisions of labor and the politics of silence among indigenous women of Guatemala and Mexico. In an afterword, Spivak herself considers her essay`s past interpretations and future incarnations and the questions and histories that remain secreted in the original and revised versions of "Can the Subaltern Speak?"--both of which are reprinted in this book.
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
single unit book single unit book HAC Library - Holdings of the American Academy in Berlin HAC – 1st floor – Library Room – Open Stacks F (Affiliated) F:JV51 .C28 2010 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 2023-1765

Formerly CIP Uk. - Includes bibliographical references and index

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak`s original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism`s "worlding" of the world. Spivak`s essay hones in on the historical and ideological factors that obstruct the possibility of being heard for those who inhabit the periphery. It is a probing interrogation of what it means to have political subjectivity, to be able to access the state, and to suffer the burden of difference in a capitalist system that promises equality yet withholds it at every turn. Since its publication, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" has been cited, invoked, imitated, and critiqued. In these phenomenal essays, eight scholars take stock of the effects and response to Spivak`s work. They begin by contextualizing the piece within the development of subaltern and postcolonial studies and the quest for human rights. Then, through the lens of Spivak`s essay, they rethink historical problems of subalternity, voicing, and death. A final section situates "Can the Subaltern Speak?" within contemporary issues, particularly new international divisions of labor and the politics of silence among indigenous women of Guatemala and Mexico. In an afterword, Spivak herself considers her essay`s past interpretations and future incarnations and the questions and histories that remain secreted in the original and revised versions of "Can the Subaltern Speak?"--both of which are reprinted in this book.

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