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Blueprint the evolutionary origins of a good society Nicholas A. Christakis

By: Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: New York Boston London Little, Brown Spark March 2019Edition: First editionDescription: xxi, 520 Seiten, 8 ungezählte Seiten Illustrationen, DiagrammeContent type:
  • Text
Media type:
  • ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen
Carrier type:
  • Band
ISBN:
  • 9780316230032
  • 9780316423915
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 576.801
LOC classification:
  • QH360.5
Other classification:
  • MS 9350
  • 71.49
Online resources: Summary: Preface: our common humanity -- The society within us -- Unintentional communities -- Intentional communities -- Artificial communities -- First comes love -- Animal attraction -- Animal friends -- Friends and networks -- One way to be social -- Remote control -- Genes and culture -- Natural and social lawsSummary: For too long, scientists have focused on the dark side of our biological heritage: our capacity for aggression, cruelty, prejudice, and self-interest. But natural selection has given us a suite of beneficial social features, including our capacity for love, friendship, cooperation, and learning. Beneath all our inventions -- our tools, farms, machines, cities, nations -- we carry with us innate proclivities to make a good society. In Blueprint, Nicholas A. Christakis introduces the compelling idea that our genes affect not only our bodies and behaviors, but also the ways in which we make societies, ones that are surprisingly similar worldwide. With many vivid examples -- including diverse historical and contemporary cultures, communities formed in the wake of shipwrecks, commune dwellers seeking utopia, online groups thrown together by design or involving artificially intelligent bots, and even the tender and complex social arrangements of elephants and dolphins that so resemble our own -- Christakis shows that, despite a human history replete with violence, we cannot escape our social blueprint for goodness. In a world of increasing political and economic polarization, it's tempting to ignore the positive role of our evolutionary past. But by exploring the ancient roots of goodness in civilization, Blueprint shows that our genes have shaped societies for our welfare and that, in a feedback loop stretching back many thousands of years, societies have shaped, and are still shaping, our genes today
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
single unit book single unit book HAC Library - Holdings of the American Academy in Berlin HAC – 1st floor – Library Room – Open Stacks F (Affiliated) F:QH360.5 .C497 2019 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 2023-4637
Browsing HAC Library - Holdings of the American Academy in Berlin shelves, Shelving location: HAC – 1st floor – Library Room – Open Stacks, Collection: F (Affiliated) Close shelf browser (Hides shelf browser)
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F:ML3916 .L54 2019 Music and the new global culture from the great exhibitions to the jazz age F:PS3602.L885 W67 2016 The work-shy F:PS3619.A278 O74 2019 The organs of sense F:QH360.5 .C497 2019 Blueprint the evolutionary origins of a good society F:N1 Nachts, wenn die Worte leuchten Jenny Holzers Installation "OH" in Berlin F:DD857.A2 H34 1995 The house at the bridge a story of modern Germany F:PS3525.I5156 I17 1967 I don't need you any more stories

Literaturverzeichnis: Seite 425-505

Preface: our common humanity -- The society within us -- Unintentional communities -- Intentional communities -- Artificial communities -- First comes love -- Animal attraction -- Animal friends -- Friends and networks -- One way to be social -- Remote control -- Genes and culture -- Natural and social laws

For too long, scientists have focused on the dark side of our biological heritage: our capacity for aggression, cruelty, prejudice, and self-interest. But natural selection has given us a suite of beneficial social features, including our capacity for love, friendship, cooperation, and learning. Beneath all our inventions -- our tools, farms, machines, cities, nations -- we carry with us innate proclivities to make a good society. In Blueprint, Nicholas A. Christakis introduces the compelling idea that our genes affect not only our bodies and behaviors, but also the ways in which we make societies, ones that are surprisingly similar worldwide. With many vivid examples -- including diverse historical and contemporary cultures, communities formed in the wake of shipwrecks, commune dwellers seeking utopia, online groups thrown together by design or involving artificially intelligent bots, and even the tender and complex social arrangements of elephants and dolphins that so resemble our own -- Christakis shows that, despite a human history replete with violence, we cannot escape our social blueprint for goodness. In a world of increasing political and economic polarization, it's tempting to ignore the positive role of our evolutionary past. But by exploring the ancient roots of goodness in civilization, Blueprint shows that our genes have shaped societies for our welfare and that, in a feedback loop stretching back many thousands of years, societies have shaped, and are still shaping, our genes today

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